It is with great sadness we advise the passing of Terry Thorne, long-time friend and former President of Atlantic Wealth Management

It is with profound sadness we announce the death of Terry (Terence) Thorne, age 66, on March 22 in Halifax.

Terry was the son of the late William Charles and Anna May (Bell) Thorne. Terry was born on February 11,1955 in Saint John, N.B. and attended local area schools graduating from Saint John High School in 1973 and the University of New Brunswick in 1977.

Terry was proud to be a Chartered Accountant and spent the first half of his business career with Ernst and Young (previously Clarkson Gordon) in New Brunswick. The second half of Terry’s career saw him in ownership positions with several small businesses in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, most notably Mitchell McConnell Insurance in Saint John and Atlantic Wealth Management in Halifax.

Terry continually volunteered throughout his career in many roles. He was most proud of being Chairperson of the New Brunswick Heart Foundation, Chairperson of St. David’s United Church in Rothesay, N.B., treasurer of the New Brunswick Institute of Chartered Accountants, and treasurer of the Riverside Golf and Country club. Terry spent several years on the Executive and as Treasurer of Adsum for Women and Children. He was an active member at Bedford United Church and served on various committees.

Terry is survived by the love of his life Linda (Flower) Thorne, their three children C.T. Thorne of Halifax, Michael Thorne (Shannon Nudds) of Halifax, and An Thorne of Snow Lake Keep in Hampton, NS. Terry loved and adored his three grandchildren, Olivia Thorne-Sparks and Leah and Alex Thorne, all of Halifax. Terry is also survived by two brothers, Richard (Sandra) Thorne of Hampton N.B. and William “Bill” (Nancy) Thorne of Saint John, sister in law Jude Flower of Moncton, and brother in law Paul Flower of Saint John. Surviving also are Terry’s two nieces, Cynthia (Sean) Kelley and Kimberly (Ronald) Wright and were very close from childhood with Uncle T. Finally, Terry was raised with his uncle Thomas Bell of Hampton and was very close to Tom and his two children, Shelagh and Andrew. He is survived by his uncles Eugene (Barbara) Thorne, Philip Thorne, and Leslie (Lorna) Thorne all of Saint John and numerous cousins and friends.

Terry was a joy to be with and found the fun in everything. He had many friends and looked forward to his daily phone calls. Terry and Linda travelled extensively over the years to warmer destinations and there was usually golf involved. Terry was passionate about golf and they wintered in Florida for many years. He will be remembered by many close friends in Florida with whom they had so much fun. Those are memories he cherished.

Closer to home, Terry loved his home course of Glen Arbour and loved meeting his golf buddies on the first tee. Weather rarely factored into this. He earned the name “the smiling assassin” after a match play event, which he found hilarious.

Terry battled acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in his last year and his brother Bill donated his bone marrow in an attempt to slow or halt the progression of Terry’s leukemia. Terry was overwhelmed by the care he received at the VG on the hematology floor 8A and 8BMT. He initiated a fund-raising effort for the ward and this was his mission for several months. He could not say enough about the nursing care he received and wanted to mention a special doctor, Dr. Abdullah Quereshi who provided exemplary care. Also, the nurses in the medical day unit took great care of him. There will be a link to the fundraising page at the end for those who would like to contribute to this worthwhile cause that was so dear to his heart.

His warm and generous personality was only outdone by his laughter and love of life itself. He was happiest spending time with his children and grandchildren and his legacy will live on through them. While his life was shortened by AML, Terry was grateful for the blessed time he had on this earth and expressed that sentiment often.

In keeping with his wishes, cremation has taken place.

Due to the current Covid-19 restrictions, there will be a private funeral service for invited guests at the Bedford United Church on Date to be determined.
For those wishing to view the service virtually, please refer to the Bedford United Church’s Facebook page or the direct link on Terry’s memorial obituary page.
There will be a celebration of our dear Terry’s life later in the summer when, hopefully, restrictions are lifted.

View Online Memorial – Date to be determined

 

In lieu of flowers, a donation made to Terry’s AML Journey fundraiser through the QEII Foundation (link under donations tab) or a charity of your choice would be greatly appreciated.

Donate to QEII and Read about Terry’s AML Journey

 

Online condolences may be expressed by visiting www.atlanticfuneralhomes.com (Dartmouth Chapel)

Sign the Guestbook and share your memories of Terry

 

 

“Grief is the price we pay for love.”

 

Essential tips and tricks for paying less tax and keeping more of your retirement income

Essential tips and tricks for paying less tax and keeping more of your retirement income

Most of your retirement income sources are taxable; Canadian Pension Plan (CPP), your personal pension plan (if you have one) and income from your RRIFs. However, if you’ve set up a TFSA in addition to your RRSPs, then you’re in luck – money you take out of your TFSA isn’t taxable!

We have some tips on combining savvy withdrawal strategies with retirement-related tax deductions to keep more of your retirement income.

Make a Plan

Determine all the different sources of retirement income you’ll have – don’t forget about things like annuities, GICs or income from a rental property if you have one. Once you have a complete list, a professional financial advisor can give you tips on when it’s best to start collecting pension income as well as how much to withdraw from your taxable investments. A strong plan can help reduce the amount of tax you have to pay and extend the life of your retirement income!

Split your pension income

If you have reached the age of 65 and have a pension, you can split up to 50% of the pension income with your spouse. Splitting your pension with a lower-income spouse can add up to savings, as this will cut down on the amount of taxes you’ll have to pay overall.

While rewarding, the process to split your pension income can be complicated, so it’s best to get professional advice before starting this process.

Buy an annuity

Annuities are a financial product that will provide you with a guaranteed regular income – a good choice if you are worried about your retirement savings running out.

These are the most common types of annuities:

  • Life annuities provide you with a guaranteed lifetime income, with the option for the annuity to be paid to a beneficiary after you die.

  • Term-certain annuities provide guaranteed income payments for a fixed period. A beneficiary or your estate will receive regular payments if you die before the term ends.

  • Variable annuities will provide you with both a fixed income and a variable income. The variable income will be based on the return of the annuity provider on the performance of the investments your annuity provider invests your money in.

All types of annuities will spread out the income from your retirement savings to lessen the tax you pay each year.

Take advantage of tax breaks

Now that you’re retired, there are retirement-related tax breaks you need to know about. Here are some of the tax breaks or credits you may be eligible for:

  • The age amount

  • The home accessibility tax credit

  • The medical expense tax credit

  • The disability tax credit

  • The pension income tax credit

We can help!

We can put together a plan that helps you keep more of your retirement income – call us today!

Don’t lose all your hard-earned money to taxes

Don’t lose all your hard-earned money to taxes

Tax planning is an essential part of managing your money – both while living and after your death. You want to maximize the amount of money to your beneficiaries, not the government. We have three tips to help you reduce taxes on your hard-earned money:

  1. Make the most of the lifetime capital gains exemption

  2. Decrease your end-of-life tax bill

  3. Look into Immediate Financing Arrangements

Lifetime capital gains exemption

The good news is that you can save a lot of money on taxes using the lifetime capital gains exemption. The bad news is that you could lose out on some of those savings unless you follow all the appropriate steps. Having a financial team to guide you through these steps is essential. When it comes to selling all or part of your business, your lawyer, accountant, and financial advisor must be all on the same page.

End-of-life tax bill

As with the lifetime capital gains exemption, working with your financial team to ensure your affairs are in order is crucial. Without the proper paperwork, your hard-earned money may not go to the family members, friends, or charities you want to support. Take the time to ensure that your wishes are properly documented and that you have filled out all essential paperwork.

Consider an Immediate Financing Arrangement

An Immediate Financing Arrangement (IFA) lets your business:

  • Get a life insurance premium on behalf of a shareholder

  • Create a tax deduction

  • Transfer assets tax-free from the business to a shareholder’s estate

Also, you can use an IFA to help increase your business’ cash flow by pledging the life insurance policy as collateral for a loan. The loan can be invested into the business or other investments if the company does not need the additional cash flow.

The Takeaway

While this can all seem overwhelming, it is essential to make sure you take the proper steps to protect your business and minimize your tax bill. But you don’t have to do this alone – contact us today for expert advice and guidance.

Financial Planning For Self-Employed Contractors

Financial Planning for Self-Employed Contractors

Being a self-employed contractor can bring you a large cash flow and the satisfaction of being your own boss – but it can also make financial planning more complicated than being an employee.

When creating a financial plan, Self-employed contractors need to keep the following in mind:

  • Cash flow management – Knowing what money you have moving in and out of your business is essential. You never want to suddenly find out you are short on cash, especially if you are considering expanding your business.
  • Tax planning – Tax planning can be complicated for self-employed contractors. Working with a professional can help ensure you are aware of your options, such as claiming the correct tax deductions and the most tax-effective way to pay yourself.
  • Attracting and retaining good employees – Employees are looking for more than just a good paycheque; they also want a robust benefits program, work-life balance, and pension plans.
  • Risk management – You must protect yourself if something happens to you, such as being injured or falling ill. The best way to protect yourself is with the right insurance, such as disability, critical illness, and life insurance.
  • Retirement planning – As a self-employed contractor, this is a must as you won’t have a company pension plan to fall back on. You can’t work forever, so it’s essential to have a variety of income sources during your retirement years, including RRSPs, TFSAs, and an Individual Pension Plan (IPP).
  • Succession planning – This type of planning is critical and can be triggered by various events, including divorce, retirement, and your illness or death. You must put a plan in place that covers what will happen if any of these events occur. In addition, it’s essential to have the financial resources to ensure the plan can be successfully enacted.
  • Buy-sell agreement – If you are a self-employed contractor working with a partner, you must have a buy-sell agreement. This agreement stipulates what will happen if one partner leaves the business for any reason. Buy-sell agreements can be funded in various ways, including via life insurance.

The best way to ensure you’ve got a solid financial plan is to work with a good team who has your best interests in mind. No matter what aspect of financial planning you are interested in – from tax planning to succession planning – we can help you get started. So call us or contact us online today to get started!

July/August COMMENT Newsletter

COMMENT for July/August 2022

COMMENT is an informative newsletter targeted to the unique niche that CLU advisors occupy in the financial services industry, with a focus on risk management, wealth creation and preservation, estate planning, and wealth transfer.

Recent Technical Updates Involving the Value of Life Insurance

by Florence Marino

Let’s examine the recent Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) technical interpretations involving life insurance and valuation. Charitable Gift of a Permanent Life Insurance Policy Arising from a Term Conversion A charity may provide a receipt for a gift of a life insurance policy for its fair market value (FMV).

Retirement Income and the Order of Asset Withdrawal

By Frank Di Pietro

Canada’s population is aging quickly. According to Investor Economics, there will be more than 10 million Canadians over the age of 65 within 20 years, representing nearly one-quarter of the total population. Since the average retirement age is 63 and Canadians are living longer, the average retirement could last 25 to 30 years or more in some cases, using current mortality tables.

Did You Know…

You can add your information to this issue of COMMENT to personalize the newsletter when sending to your clients or colleagues:

  1. Log in to your Institute account to access the latest issue of COMMENT.
     

  2. Once you are successfully logged in, click the CLU COMMENT link to access the latest version of COMMENT.
     

  3. Click the download icon in the top left hand corner of the embedded issue of COMMENT.
     

  4. Save the issue to your computer as a pdf file.
     

  5. When you open the pdf file, simply add your personal information to the right hand upper corner of the first page of the newsletter.

Five Ways To Withdraw Money From Your Business In A Tax-Efficient Manner

Five Ways To Withdraw Money From Your Business In A Tax-Efficient Manner

You have worked long and hard to build up your business, and now you are ready to withdraw money from your business’ bank account. But you don’t want to get hit with a huge tax bill. So here are 5 ways to withdraw money from your business in a tax-efficient manner.

1) Pay Yourself And Your Family Members

You can pay yourself a salary from your business and pay any family members who work in your business. However, the salary you pay family members must not be excessive – it must be in line with what they would receive for doing the same work elsewhere.

You and your family members will be taxed at the regular personal marginal tax rates on your salaries. However, your corporation can make a deduction based on salaries paid when determining taxable income.

2) Pay Out Taxable Dividends

You can use dividends to distribute money from your corporation to both yourself and family members if everyone holds shares in your corporation. However, when distributing dividends to a shareholder, it is critical to consider both the tax on split income (TOSI) rules and the corporate attribution rules before any distribution is made.

  • TOSI rules – Under the current income tax rules, the TOSI applies the highest marginal tax rate (currently 33%) to “split income” of an individual under the age of 18. In general, an individual’s split income includes certain taxable dividends, taxable capital gains and income from partnerships or trusts. – Canada.ca

  • Corporate attribution rules – Corporate attribution rules may result in additional tax if a transfer or loan to a corporation is made to shift income to another family member. This can result in additional tax for the individual making the transfer or loan.

3) Pay Out Capital Dividends

Another way to pay out dividends is via your corporation’s capital dividend account (CDA). Money in your corporation’s CDA can be dispersed to Canadian resident shareholders as a tax-free dividend, but be sure you are clear on what can legally be allowed in your CDA before you do this.

4) Adjust Your Salary And Dividend Mix

Keeping the right mix when paying yourself a salary and paying yourself via dividends is essential. You need to consider various factors – such as your cash flow needs, earned income for RRSP contributions, and any impact on taxes and other regulatory requirements – paying out salaries and dividends can have.

5) Repay Any Outstanding Shareholder Loans

If you loaned money to your company in the form of a shareholder loan, now may be the time to have your company repay that loan. Any money you receive to settle your shareholder loan will be paid to you as a tax-free distribution.

The Takeaway

Regardless of why you need to take cash out of your business, it is crucial to plan how to withdraw the money so you can do it in the most tax-efficient manner possible. Unfortunately, there is no one-size-fits-all solution for this, which is why talking to a professional advisor is so important.

We can help design a tax-optimized compensation strategy for you. Contact us to set up a meeting today!

The Six Steps to Financial Planning

The Six Steps to Financial Planning

Many people put off planning for their financial future because they’re overwhelmed with all the decisions they have to make. The good news is that there’s help at hand – in the form of a certified financial planner. A certified financial planner is trained to focus on all aspects of your finances – everything from your taxes to retirement savings.

A certified financial planner will develop a plan that works for you both today and in the future.

Meeting your financial planner

When you first meet with your financial planner, they will tell you about their obligations and responsibilities. They should:

  • Give you a general overview of the financial planning process

  • Tell you what services they provide and how they are compensated for them

  • Let you know what they will expect from you as a client

You should let your financial planner know how involved you want to be in creating and executing your financial plan. You should also ask any questions about the process or how compensation works.

Determining your goals and expectations

Now you’re ready to make your plan. But first, you and your financial planner should discuss your personal and financial goals and your current and future needs and priorities.

Your financial planner will make sure they have all the details they need. They may ask you to fill in questionnaires or provide documentation on your current financial state.

Reviewing your current financial state

Before your financial planner can get started on your financial plan, they need to know about your current situation – including cash flow, net worth and any taxes you may owe in the future.

To customize your financial plan, so it works for you, your financial planner must know about anything that could impact it – for example, a dependent adult child.

Developing the financial plan

Once they have all the information they need, your financial planner will create a customized plan that aligns with your goals, objectives, and risk tolerance. They will also provide you with information on projected returns and recommended actions.

Implementing the plan

Once you approve it, your financial planner should implement your plan. They should also help you contact other professionals they’ve recommended to assist with your financial plan – such as a lawyer or an insurance agent.

Monitoring the plan

Your certified financial planner should periodically contact you to adjust your financial plan. In addition, a life change – such as the birth of a child or retirement – may require adjustments to your financial plan.

It can be hard to plan for the future – but you don’t have to do it alone. Contact a certified financial planner or us today!

When and Why You Should Conduct an Insurance Audit

As our lives grow and change with variable circumstances, new additions, and job transitions, our needs for insurance will also evolve. Additionally, economic fluctuations and external circumstances that influence your insurance policy will need frequent re-evaluation to ensure that you are making the most appropriate and financially favorable decisions. Perhaps you aren’t sure whether you should conduct an insurance audit or not. The following scenarios are usually a good indication that you should thoroughly assess and review your current policy contract: 

  • Bringing new life into your family? A new baby may not only prompt you to adjust your beneficiary information, but it is likely to change or influence your coverage needs.

  • Changing jobs? Probationary periods may not provide the same level of disability or accident insurance.

  • Is your policy nearing the end of its term? Be sure to compare prices for new policies as they can sometimes be more affordable as compared to renewing the current plan.

  • Has your marital status changed? Your insurance policy will likely need updating to reflect such.

The specific type of insurance policy you carry as well as personal details certainly influence coverage and premium prices, so if any of the following factors apply to you, be sure to update your policy accordingly. You might be eligible for a rate reduction. 

  • Changes to your overall risk assessment like smoking cessation, dangerous hobbies, high risk profession etc.

  • If you have experienced improvements to a previously diagnosed health condition.

  • Do your policy’s investment options still fall in line with current market conditions?

  • Have you used your insurance policy as collateral for a loan? Once that loan is paid off, collateral status should be taken off the policy.

Insurance policies generated for business purposes should also be regularly reviewed to make sure the policy still offers adequate coverage to meet the needs of the company and includes the appropriate beneficiary information. With life happening so quickly, it can be easy to forget about keeping insurance policies up to date, however, major changes can have a profound impact on coverage and premiums. Be sure to conduct insurance audits often to ensure your policies are still meeting your needs. 

Contact us to see how we can help. 

2022 Ontario Budget Highlights

Ontario 2022 Budget Highlights

On April 29, 2022, Ontario’s Minister of Finance delivered the province’s 2022 budget, based on five different pillars. 

No Changes To Corporate or Personal Tax Rates

Budget 2022 did not introduce changes to Ontario’s corporate or personal tax rates.

Rebuilding The Economy

Budget 2022 wants to help rebuild the economy as follows:

  • Almost $1 billion is committed to critical legacy infrastructure, such as all-seasons roads.

  • Creating good manufacturing jobs. In the past 18 months, 12 billion dollars have been invested in supporting new electric vehicle production and battery manufacturing.

  • Enable Ontario employers to realize an estimated $8.9 billion in cost savings by cutting taxes and lowering electricity costs.

Better Jobs and Bigger Paycheques

Another focus is on more significant paycheques and better job opportunities. To support this:

  • The general minimum wage will rise to $15.50 per hour starting October 1, 2022.

  • $1 billion will be committed annually to employment and training programs for learning new skills or upgrading existing ones. 

  • Over three years, $114.4 million has been committed to the Skilled Trades Strategy, including expanding in-class training.

  • Ontario is expanding college degree granting. Colleges can start offering new degree programs in various sectors, including the automotive industry and health care.

Building Highways and Key Infrastructure

Budget 2022 commits to: 

  • Investing $158.8 billion in crucial infrastructure over ten years, with $20 billion spent in 2022–23.

  • $25.1 billion being spent over ten years to support major highways such as the Bradford Bypass, Highway 413, Highway 401 and Highway 7.

  • $61.6 billion over ten years to support public transit. This includes expanding GO train services to London and Bowmanville and expanding passenger rail service to Northern Ontario.

Keeping Costs Down

Another focus of Budget 2022 is to help people save money:

  • Tolls will be removed on Highways 412 and 418.

  • Starting July 1, the gas tax will be cut by 5.7 cents per litre for six months.

  • License plate renewal fees will be eliminated and refunded, leading to a $120/year savings in Southern Ontario and $60/year savings in Northern Ontario.

  • $300 in additional tax relief will be available on average for 1.1 million lower-income workers via the proposed Low-income Individuals and Families Tax Credit enhancement.

  • Supporting the creation of all types of housing.

  • Working towards an average of $10-a-day child care by September 2025.

Investing in Health Care

Budget 2022 also understands the importance of continuing to invest in health care. Money is committed as follows:

  • Over $40 billion for hospitals and other health infrastructure over ten years.

  • $764 million over two years to provide nurses with a retention incentive of up to $5,000.

  • $42.5 million over two years to expand medical education and training.

  • $1 billion for in-home care over three years.

We can help!

Wondering how tax changes in this year’s budget may impact personal finances or business affairs? Reach out to us – we’re here to answer any questions you may have!

2022 Federal Budget Highlights

Federal Budget 2022 – Highlights

On April 7, 2022, the Federal Government released their 2022 budget. We have broken down the highlights of the financial measures in this budget into the following different sections:

  • Housing

  • Alternative minimum tax

  • Dental care

  • Small businesses

  • Tradespeople

  • Canada Growth Fund

  • Climate

  • Bank and insurer taxes

Housing

There were several tax measures related to housing introduced in the budget.

Budget 2022 introduced a new kind of savings account – a Tax-Free First Home Savings Account (FHSA).

These are the key things you need to know about the new FHSAs:

  • You must be at least 18 years of age and a resident of Canada to open an account. You must also not currently own a home or have owned one in the previous four calendar years.

  • You can only open and use an FHSA once, and you must close it within a year after your first withdrawal.

  • Contributions are tax-deductible, and income earned in an FHSA will not be either while it is in the account or when you withdraw it.

  • There is a lifetime contribution limit of $40,00, with an annual contribution limit of $8,000. You can’t carry contribution room forward.

  • If you don’t use the funds in your FHSA within 15 years of opening it, you can transfer them to an RRSP or RRIF tax-free. Transfers to an RRSP do not impact your RRSP contribution room.

Two existing tax credits were increased, and a new one was introduced:

  • The First-Time Home Buyers’ Tax Credit amount was increased from $5000 to $10,000, giving up to $1,500 in direct support to home buyers. This tax credit applies to all homes purchased on or after January 1, 2022.

  • The annual expense limit for the Home Accessibility Tax Credit has been increased to $20,000 for 2022 and subsequent tax years.

  • A new tax credit, the Multigenerational Home Renovation Tax Credit, was introduced, which will start in 2023. This tax credit is a 15% refundable credit for eligible expenses up to $50,000 (maximum tax credit is $7,500) for constructing a secondary suite for a senior or an adult with a disability to live with a qualifying relative.

Budget 2022 proposes new rules, effective January 1, 2023, that anyone who sells a residential property they have held for less than 12 months would be subject to full taxation on their profits as business income. However, there will be some exemptions to these rules due to life events such as a death, disability, the birth of a child, a new job, or a divorce.

Budget 2022 also announces restrictions that would help ensure that Canadians, instead of foreign investors, own housing. A two-year ban will be introduced on non-residents buying residential property, with some exceptions, such as individuals who have work permits and are living in Canada.

Alternative Minimum Tax

In Canada, the top federal tax rate is 33% and starts at an income of $221,708. However, many high-income filers end up paying less tax than this due to tax deductions and tax credits.

The goal of the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT), which has been around since 1986, is to ensure high-income Canadians are paying their fair share of taxes. However, it has not been substantially updated since it was introduced. In Budget 2022, the government indicated they would be investigating changes to the AMT, which will likely be disclosed in the fall 2022 economic update.

Dental Care

For many Canadians without private coverage, going to the dentist is too expensive. Budget 2022 commits $5.3 billion to provide dental care for Canadians with family incomes of less than $90,000 annually. Coverage will start for children under 12 this year and expand to children under 18, seniors and those living with a disability in 2023, with the program will be fully implemented by 2025.

Small Businesses

Small businesses currently have a 9% tax rate on the first $500,000 of taxable income (compared to the corporate tax rate of 15%). However, after a small business’ capital employed in Canada reaches $15 million, it is no longer eligible for the 9% tax rate.

Budget 2022 proposes gradually phasing out the small business tax rate so that businesses are not discouraged from expanding. The new cut-off for the lower tax rate will be $50 million.

Budget 2022 also includes a proposal to create an Employee Ownership Trust. This would be a new, dedicated trust under the Income Tax Act to support employee ownership.

Tradespeople

Budget 2022 introduces the Labour Mobility Deduction. This would allow eligible tradespersons and apprentices to deduct up to $4,000 a year in eligible travel and temporary relocation expenses.

Budget 2022 also commits to providing $84.2 million over four years to double funding for the Union Training and Innovation Program, which would help 3,500 apprentices from underrepresented groups each year.

Canada Growth Fund

Budget 2022 introduces a new Canada Growth Fund, with the goals of both diversifying our economy and helping achieve our climate goals.

The Canada Growth Fund aims to attract considerable private sector investment, support the restructuring of vital supply chains, and bolster our exports. The Canada Growth Fund will also provide backing to reduce our emissions and invest in the growth of low-carbon industries.

Climate

Budget 2022 continues to confirm the government’s commitment to fighting climate change. It commits $1.7 billion over five years to extend the Incentives for Zero-Emission Vehicles Program until March 2025 and also provides funding to create a national network of electric vehicle charging stations.

Budget 2022 also commits $250 million over four years to support the development of clean electricity, including inter-provincial electricity transmission projects and Small Modular Reactors.

Bank And Insurer Taxes

Budget 2022 introduced a new financial measure called the Canada Recovery Dividend. Banks and insurers will have to pay a one-time, 15% tax on 2021 taxable income above $1 billion. This tax will be payable over five years.

Budget 2022 also proposes increasing the tax rate on income above $100 million for banks and insurers to 16.5% (currently 15% for other corporations).

Wondering How This May Impact You?

If you have any questions or concerns about how the new federal budget may impact you, call us – we’d be happy to help you!

2021 Income Tax Year Tips

Tax Tips You Need To Know Before Filing Your 2021 Taxes

This year’s tax deadline is April 30, 2022. We’ve got a list of tips to help you save on your taxes!

Claiming home office expenses

You can claim up to $500 under the “flat rate” method if you worked at home due to COVID-19. To claim more, you must use the detailed method to claim home office expenses.

Employer-provided benefits

If your employer reimburses you for certain costs (such as commuting costs, parking, and home office equipment) due to COVID-19, the CRA will generally not consider this a taxable benefit.

Repaying Covid-19 support payments

If you repaid COVID-19 benefits, you can deduct the amount on your tax return either for the year you received the benefit or the year you repaid it, or you can split the deduction between both years.

Climate Action incentive can no longer be claimed

As of 2021, this amount can’t be claimed as a refundable credit; instead, you’ll receive quarterly payments via the benefits system.

Disability tax credit (DTC)

If you or a family member are DTC claimants, then you should review the updated criteria for the tax credit in regards to mental functions, life-sustaining therapy and calculating therapy time.

Eligible educator school supply tax credit

This tax credit has been increased to 25 percent for eligible supplies (such as books and games) to a maximum of $1,000.

Tax deduction on interest payments

You can claim a tax deduction for the interest you’ve paid on any money you’ve borrowed to invest. However, you can only do this if you use the money to earn investment income (for example, a rental property).

The digital subscriptions tax credit

You can claim up to $500 as a tax credit if you have a digital subscription to a qualifying Canadian news outlet.

Self-employed? Be sure to set aside enough for personal income tax!

If you’re self-employed, be sure you put aside enough money (we recommend 25% of your income) to pay your tax bill when the time comes. You’re taxed only on your net income (total income minus expenses).

You need to plan ahead for tax changes if you want to retire abroad

Planning to retire abroad? If so, you need to be aware of the tax implications and plan accordingly. If you sell your house and move, you may be considered a “non-resident” and be subject to capital gains taxes on non-registered investments (even if you have not sold them) or have your pension subjected to a withholding tax.

You can stop making CPP contributions if you’re over 65 but plan to keep working

If you’re 65 and already collecting Canada Pension Plan (CPP) benefits but also still working, you may be able to stop making CPP contributions. To do so, you need to fill in the form CPT30.

Need help?

Not sure if you qualify for a credit or deduction? Give us a call – we’re here to save you money on your taxes!